Keep Pemaquid Peninsula Beautiful

PWA is Maine’s First Affiliate of Keep America Beautiful

Pemaquid Watershed Association is a proud affiliate of Keep America Beautiful (KAB), the nation’s leading nonprofit bringing people together to build and sustain vibrant communities. PWA was certified as a KAB affiliate in May 2014.

The mission of PWA’s Keep Pemaquid Peninsula Beautiful initiative is to preserve and enhance the natural beauty of the Pemaquid Peninsula by promoting a clean, litter-free environment.

Keep Pemaquid Peninsula Beautiful focuses on:

Come back often to this page to see how the Keep Pemaquid Peninsula Beautiful initiative blossoms!

Join our Corps of Litter Pickeruppers

Click here to learn about our litter pick-up events.

Keep Pemaquid Peninsula Beautiful clean-up participant

About Plastic:

Keep Pemaquid Peninsula Beautiful logo
KPPB President's Circle logo

back to top


Keep Pemaquid Peninsula Beautiful by Recycling

America Recycles Day

America Recycles Day bannerAmerica Recycles Day, a Keep America Beautiful program, is a nationally recognized day dedicated to promoting and celebrating recycling in the United States. Every year on or around November 15, America Recycles Day empowers people to recycle through thousands of events across the nation.

Take the Pledge

The current national recycling rate is only 34.5%. Join us in recycling more and encouraging others to start recycling. Pledge to learn, act, and share about the importance of recycling and know that you are among over 63,000 people across the country who care enough to also take the pledge to walk the talk of recycling.

Keep Pemaquid Peninsula Beautiful recycling bin

One of 6 recycling bins that PWA gave to the Town of Bristol for use at their parks. In total PWA gave 20 bins to the local towns and YMCA in 2014, which was made possible by a grant from Keep America Beautiful.

Recycle for a Cause!

Redeem your used bottles and cans locally and direct the cash to PWA!

How to Dispose of the Waste You Generate and Stuff You No Longer Want

Town Transfer Stations

Click on the link for a brochure on what each transfer station accepts.

How to dispose of items that can’t (or shouldn’t) go to the dump — click to show list

back to top


PWA group displaying Keep Pemaquid Peninsula Beautiful plaque

The people who were key in launching the Keep Pemaquid Peninsula Beautiful (KPPB) Initiative (Left to Right): Keep America Beautiful (KAB) Trainer Sue Smith, Lynne Gilbert, Joanna Holland (aka The Anti-Trash Queen), PWA Executive Director Donna Minnis (dubbed the Queen of Green), PWA President Peggy Drake (holding the official Affiliation Certificate), Louise Riley, Linda Shaffer, Joan Panek, and former KAB VP and KPPB financial sponsor Susan Foster. Lynne, Joanna, Louise, Linda, and Joan serve on the KPPB Steering Committee. Not shown: PWA Program Coordinator, Carolyn Shubert, who supports the Steering Committee. Photo by Tim Badgley.


A Word about Plastic Pollution

with text courtesy of 5gyres.org

Take a look around you…most of what we eat, drink, or use in any way comes packaged in petroleum plastic — a material designed to last forever, yet used for products that we then throw away. This throwaway mentality is a relatively recent phenomenon. Just a generation ago, we packaged our products in reusable or recyclable materials – glass, metals, and paper, and designed products that would last. Today, our landfills and beaches are awash in plastic packaging, and expendable products that have no value at the end of their short lifecycle.

The short-term convenience of using and throwing away plastic products carries a very inconvenient long-term truth. These plastic water bottles, cups, utensils, electronics, toys, and gadgets we dispose of daily are rarely recycled in a closed loop. We currently recover only 5% of the plastics we produce. What happens to the rest of it? Roughly 50% is buried in landfills, some is remade into durable goods, and much of it remains “unaccounted for”, lost in the environment where it ultimately washes out to sea.

Though some products, like plastic bottles, have a recovery plan, most do not. Even fewer are truly recycled. Plastic lost at sea is an environmental and potential human health hazard. We must demand zero tolerance for plastic pollution. Reducing our consumption and production of plastic waste, and choosing cost-effective alternatives will go a long way towards protecting our seas and, ultimately, ourselves.

Join us in being part of the solution:

  • Reduce your purchase of plastic packaging and use of plastic bags.
  • Take this challenge:  Walk into any grocery or department store and try to fill a grocery cart with individual products that are not made from, packaged, or labeled with plastic.
  • Properly dispose of plastic waste.
  • Help us pick up plastic debris.

Learn more about how plastics are made and recycled

Did you know that there are seven types of plastics?

In the land-based solid waste stream, the largest category of plastics are those used in containers and packaging, such as soft drink bottles, lids, and shampoo bottles.

In the marine environment, plastics are a component of a broad range of debris, anything from nets and rope used for fishing to shopping bags and beverage bottles. Thousands of marine animals die each year from entanglement in or ingestion of plastic debris that they mistake for food. See this “Plastic Marine Debris: What We Know” FAQ info sheet from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

Further resources:

back to top


KPPB News

  • TALKIN’ TRASH: Pemaquid Peninsula Litter Cleanups There’s something strange in the neighborhood. I’ve started noticing pickle jars alongside a few roads on the peninsula. Large, empty, glass, Vlasic pickle jars. It’s anyone’s guess how they got there or what else is lurking along our roadways, but here’s an … Read more →
  • TALKIN’ TRASH: The Trouble with Litter According to the 2009 litter survey by Keep America Beautiful (KAB), more than 51 billion pieces of litter appear alongside American roads each year — 6,729 items per mile of roadway!
    In the 40 years between KAB’s 1969 study and the 2009 study, paper, metal, glass, … Read more →
  • TALKIN’ TRASH: Good Practices for Small Businesses Success of a business can be measured by the three E’s: economy, employees, and the environment. Most businesses are created to be economically viable — the business needs to make enough money to reap a profit. Employees who are productive, happy, and safe … Read more →
  • TALKIN’ TRASH: Recycling Odds and Ends, Part I Have you ever wondered about how to properly dispose of those odd items? By that I mean the ones that you don’t have to get rid of very often, which means that trying to figure out what to do with them to keep them out … Read more →
  • ecomaine The importance of using recycling and composting to reduce waste that goes into landfills cannot be overemphasized. Disposal of municipal solid waste is a growing challenge in Maine due to declining landfill space, high disposal costs, and environmental health risks.
    At our local transfer stations … Read more →
  • TALKIN’ TRASH: Pemaquid Peninsula Litter Cleanups There’s something strange in the neighborhood. I’ve started noticing pickle jars alongside a few roads on the peninsula. Large, empty, glass, Vlasic pickle jars. It’s anyone’s guess how they got there or what else is lurking along our roadways, but here’s an … Read more →
  • TALKIN’ TRASH: The Trouble with Litter According to the 2009 litter survey by Keep America Beautiful (KAB), more than 51 billion pieces of litter appear alongside American roads each year — 6,729 items per mile of roadway!
    In the 40 years between KAB’s 1969 study and the 2009 study, paper, metal, glass, … Read more →
  • TALKIN’ TRASH: Good Practices for Small Businesses Success of a business can be measured by the three E’s: economy, employees, and the environment. Most businesses are created to be economically viable — the business needs to make enough money to reap a profit. Employees who are productive, happy, and safe … Read more →
  • TALKIN’ TRASH: Recycling Odds and Ends, Part I Have you ever wondered about how to properly dispose of those odd items? By that I mean the ones that you don’t have to get rid of very often, which means that trying to figure out what to do with them to keep them out … Read more →
  • ecomaine The importance of using recycling and composting to reduce waste that goes into landfills cannot be overemphasized. Disposal of municipal solid waste is a growing challenge in Maine due to declining landfill space, high disposal costs, and environmental health risks.
    At our local transfer stations … Read more →

Click here for more news stories.

back to top

SITE MAP
584 Main Street • PO Box 552 • Damariscotta, Maine 04543
207-563-2196 • info@pemaquidwatershed.org
Find us on Facebook and become a fan!
© 2017 Pemaquid Watershed Association. All Rights Reserved.
Website by Hermit Thrush Design.
log in